GPO Disable Password Expiration or Password Complexity

This content is 2 years old. Technology changes with time. Keep that in mind as you read this article.

Big Fat Warning:  Don’t do this.

How to disable password expiration

  1. Load Local Group Policy Editor (Start –> Type gpedit.msc –> Enter)
  2. Expand sections: Local Computer Policy –> Computer Configuration –> Windows Settings –> Security Settings –> Account Policies –> Password Policy
  3. Set Maximum password age to 0 to completely disable passwords from expiring.

How to disable password complexity

  1. Load Local Group Policy Editor (Start –> Type gpedit.msc –> Enter)
  2. Expand sections: Local Computer Policy –> Computer Configuration –> Windows Settings –> Security Settings –> Account Policies –> Password Policy
  3. Set Password must meet complexity requirements to Disabled to completely disable password complexity requirements.

Exchange Server 2016 SPLA SAL Comparison

This content is 2 years old. Technology changes with time. Keep that in mind as you read this article.

The following feature list is applicable to Exchange Server 2016 Hosted Exchange SALs. Plus SALs include the use of Microsoft Office Outlook desktop application.

The Exchange Server 2016 Hosted Exchange Basic, Exchange Server 2016 Hosted Exchange Standard, Exchange Server 2016 Hosted Exchange Standard Plus, Exchange Server 2016 Hosted Exchange Enterprise, Exchange Server 2016 Hosted Exchange Enterprise Plus and Productivity Suite SALs include the use of Outlook Web Access. You must obtain a SAL for each user.

Exchange 2016 Basic SAL

Each user for whom you obtain an Exchange Server 2016 Hosted Exchange Basic SAL may use the following features of the server software:

  • Outlook Web Access features that enable the features described in this SAL;
  • E-Discovery;
  • Exchange 2016 anti-spam;
  • Multi-Mailbox Search;
  • Messaging and personal folder access through the protocols described in this SAL;
  • Internet mail protocol (Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP), Post Office Protocol (POP), Internet Message Access Protocol (IMAP)) and Web browser access via any client;
  • Personal Mail Folders (not shared with other users);
  • Personal Address List (not shared with other users);
  • Personal Calendar (not shared with other users);
  • Personal Tasks (not shared with other users);
  • Support for a single, second level domain for a single user or user organization (user obtains the right to use ‘joe@smith.com’ or ‘joesmith@company1.com’ instead of ‘joe@servicesprovider.com’). Multiple suffixes (“.com”, “.net”, “.org”, etc.) are allowed (e.g., ‘joe@smith.com’, ‘joe@smith.net’, ‘joe@smith.de’, etc.); and
  • Global Address List: address list of all users within personalized domain or within the service provider’s entire domain.

Exchange 2016 Standard SAL, Standard Plus SAL and Productivity Suite SAL

Each user for whom you obtain an Exchange Server 2016 Hosted Exchange Standard SAL, Exchange Server 2016 Hosted Exchange Standard Plus SAL or Productivity Suite SAL may use the following features of the server software:

  • The features of the Exchange Server 2016 Hosted Exchange Basic SAL as described above;
  • Support for a multiple, second level domains for a single user or user organization;
  • Outlook Web Access features that enable the features described in this SAL;
  • Messaging Application Programming Interface (MAPI) network protocol;
  • Shared Folders;
  • Public Folders;
  • Shared Address List;
  • Shared Contacts;
  • Shared Tasks;
  • Shared Calendar;
  • Group scheduling, including viewing free/busy times of others;
  • Mobile Notification: Receive notification of events in the server software via mobile devices;
  • Mobile Browse: Access the server software inbox, calendar, address book, Global Address Book and tasks via mobile devices; and
  • Mobile Synchronization: Synchronize mobile devices over wireless networks with the server software inbox, calendar, address book and tasks.
  • Unified Messaging

Exchange 2016 Enterprise SAL, Enterprise Plus SAL

Each user for whom you obtain an Exchange Server 2016 Hosted Exchange Enterprise SAL and Exchange Server 2016 Hosted Exchange Enterprise Plus SAL may use the following features of the server software:

  • The features of the Exchange Server 2016 Hosted Exchange Standard SAL as described above;
  • Compliance Management;
  • Data Loss Prevention; and
  • In-Place Holds (Indefinite, Query-based, and Time-based)
  • In-Place Archive

Reference:  https://sur.microsoft.com/

Windows 10 File Explorer – Working on it…

This content is 2 years old. Technology changes with time. Keep that in mind as you read this article.

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When browsing my Downloads folder, or any folder in general, on Windows 10 I have experienced the Working on it… message and it takes a few seconds to load.  This doesn’t matter if I have a lot of files/folders or just a few, it still hangs.

Resolution

Open Folder Options > Set Open File Explorer to This PC. Try WinKey + E now.

If it opens fine, then problem is with Quick access cache, which can be cleared by deleting *.automaticDestinations-ms from the following directory, using Command Prompt.

del %AppData%MicrosoftWindowsRecentAutomaticDestinations*.automaticDestinations-ms

Windows Command Line Ping Sweep

This content is 2 years old. Technology changes with time. Keep that in mind as you read this article.

A brutally basic ping sweep from Windows command to look for hosts on a subnet.

for /L %x in (1,1,254) do @ping -n 1 -w 25 192.168.0.%x | find bytes=

This will return hosts that respond to ping on your LAN, for example.

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This is useful in a pinch. For hosts that don’t respond to ping, you can use arp to try to find them. What I would suggest is launching an elevated command prompt and issuing arp -d which deletes all arp entries. Then, run the ping sweep. After the sweep, save your results and then run arp -a and save those results to see if there are any gaps you can fill in.

Tip: If you want the results of your scan to be in your clipboard so you can copy/paste, use parenthesis surrounding the for and pipe (|) it to clip.

(for /L %x in (1,1,254) do @ping -n 1 -w 25 192.168.0.%x |find bytes=) | clip

Get Username from SID or SID from Username Windows Command

This content is 2 years old. Technology changes with time. Keep that in mind as you read this article.

Get username from SID:

wmic useraccount where sid='S-1-5-21-1207125215-1711319079-1335354557-1316' get name

Get SID from username:

wmic useraccount where name='username' get sid