GPO Disable Password Expiration or Password Complexity

Big Fat Warning:  Don’t do this.

How to disable password expiration

  1. Load Local Group Policy Editor (Start –> Type gpedit.msc –> Enter)
  2. Expand sections: Local Computer Policy –> Computer Configuration –> Windows Settings –> Security Settings –> Account Policies –> Password Policy
  3. Set Maximum password age to 0 to completely disable passwords from expiring.

How to disable password complexity

  1. Load Local Group Policy Editor (Start –> Type gpedit.msc –> Enter)
  2. Expand sections: Local Computer Policy –> Computer Configuration –> Windows Settings –> Security Settings –> Account Policies –> Password Policy
  3. Set Password must meet complexity requirements to Disabled to completely disable password complexity requirements.

Warning, DHCP pool range is limited to 128 addresses

For all ASA models, the maximum number of DHCP client addresses varies depending on the license:

  • If the limit is 10 hosts, the maximum available DHCP pool is 32 addresses.
  • If the limit is 50 hosts, the maximum available DHCP pool is 128 addresses.
  • If the number of hosts is unlimited, the maximum available DHCP pool is 256 addresses.

That’s annoying.

SQL Server 2016 SP1 Edition Limit Changes

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Microsoft made the following changes in their documentation (see screenshot above) to accurately reflect the memory limits on lower editions of SQL Server.

Key Points

  • The limits for In-Memory OLTP data is per database.
  • The limits for Columnstore segment cache is per SQL Server instance across all the databases in the instance.

Example Scenario

A Standard Edition of SQL Server has buffer pool memory limited to 128GB, so the data and index pages cached in buffer pool is limited by 128GB. Starting with SQL Server 2016 SP1, you can have an additional 32GB of memory for Columnstore segment cache per instance and an additional 32GB of memory quota for In-Memory OLTP per database. In addition, there can be memory consumed by other memory consumers in SQL Server which will be limited by “max server memory” or total memory on the server if max server memory is uncapped.

My Notes and Benchmarks on VMware Flash Read Cache

I’ve spent some time exploring and studying the use and configuration of VMware Flash Read Cache (vFRC) and its benefits.  These are my notes.

Useful Resources

On a guest virtual machine, vFRC is configured in Disk configuration area.  The virtual machine needs to be on version 10 hardware.  vSphere needs to be minimum version 5.5.

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Benchmarks

I took a baseline benchmark of a simple Windows Server 2016 virtual machine that had a thin provisioned 20GB disk using DskSpd (formerly sqlio).  The virtual machine disk disk is connected to an IBM DS3400 LUN with 4 x 300GB 15k RPM disks in RAID-10.

Baseline Virtual Machine

  • OS: Windows Server 2016
  • vCPU: 1
  • vRAM: 4GB
  • SCSI Controller: LSI Logic SAS
  • Virtual Disk:  40GB thin provisioned
  • Virtual machine hardware:  vmx-10
  • Virtual Flash Read Cache: 0

Some notes before running a test.  This is geared toward SQL workloads and identifies the type of I/O for the different SQL workload.

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DskSpd test

diskspd.exe -c30G -d300 -r -w0 -t8 -o8 -b8K -h -L E:	estfile.dat

Results of testing.

Command Line: diskspd.exe -c30G -d300 -r -w0 -t8 -o8 -b8K -h -L E:	estfile.dat

Input parameters:

        timespan:   1
        -------------
        duration: 300s
        warm up time: 5s
        cool down time: 0s
        measuring latency
        random seed: 0
        path: 'E:	estfile.dat'
                think time: 0ms
                burst size: 0
                software cache disabled
                hardware write cache disabled, writethrough on
                performing read test
                block size: 8192
                using random I/O (alignment: 8192)
                number of outstanding I/O operations: 8
                thread stride size: 0
                threads per file: 8
                using I/O Completion Ports
                IO priority: normal



Results for timespan 1:
*******************************************************************************

actual test time:       301.18s
thread count:           8
proc count:             1

CPU |  Usage |  User  |  Kernel |  Idle
-------------------------------------------
   0|  99.23%|   7.05%|   92.18%|   0.77%
-------------------------------------------
avg.|  99.23%|   7.05%|   92.18%|   0.77%

Total IO
thread |       bytes     |     I/Os     |     MB/s   |  I/O per s |  AvgLat  | LatStdDev |  file
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
     0 |      7940784128 |       969334 |      25.14 |    3218.43 |    2.471 |    22.884 | E:	estfile.dat (30GB)
     1 |      8152604672 |       995191 |      25.81 |    3304.28 |    2.401 |    22.211 | E:	estfile.dat (30GB)
     2 |      8116256768 |       990754 |      25.70 |    3289.55 |    2.408 |    22.080 | E:	estfile.dat (30GB)
     3 |      8180006912 |       998536 |      25.90 |    3315.38 |    2.394 |    22.936 | E:	estfile.dat (30GB)
     4 |      8192147456 |      1000018 |      25.94 |    3320.30 |    2.395 |    22.569 | E:	estfile.dat (30GB)
     5 |      8283185152 |      1011131 |      26.23 |    3357.20 |    2.375 |    21.607 | E:	estfile.dat (30GB)
     6 |      7820320768 |       954629 |      24.76 |    3169.60 |    2.508 |    21.745 | E:	estfile.dat (30GB)
     7 |      7896784896 |       963963 |      25.00 |    3200.59 |    2.479 |    21.981 | E:	estfile.dat (30GB)
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
total:       64582090752 |      7883556 |     204.49 |   26175.34 |    2.428 |    22.258

Read IO
thread |       bytes     |     I/Os     |     MB/s   |  I/O per s |  AvgLat  | LatStdDev |  file
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
     0 |      7940784128 |       969334 |      25.14 |    3218.43 |    2.471 |    22.884 | E:	estfile.dat (30GB)
     1 |      8152604672 |       995191 |      25.81 |    3304.28 |    2.401 |    22.211 | E:	estfile.dat (30GB)
     2 |      8116256768 |       990754 |      25.70 |    3289.55 |    2.408 |    22.080 | E:	estfile.dat (30GB)
     3 |      8180006912 |       998536 |      25.90 |    3315.38 |    2.394 |    22.936 | E:	estfile.dat (30GB)
     4 |      8192147456 |      1000018 |      25.94 |    3320.30 |    2.395 |    22.569 | E:	estfile.dat (30GB)
     5 |      8283185152 |      1011131 |      26.23 |    3357.20 |    2.375 |    21.607 | E:	estfile.dat (30GB)
     6 |      7820320768 |       954629 |      24.76 |    3169.60 |    2.508 |    21.745 | E:	estfile.dat (30GB)
     7 |      7896784896 |       963963 |      25.00 |    3200.59 |    2.479 |    21.981 | E:	estfile.dat (30GB)
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
total:       64582090752 |      7883556 |     204.49 |   26175.34 |    2.428 |    22.258

Write IO
thread |       bytes     |     I/Os     |     MB/s   |  I/O per s |  AvgLat  | LatStdDev |  file
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
     0 |               0 |            0 |       0.00 |       0.00 |    0.000 |       N/A | E:	estfile.dat (30GB)
     1 |               0 |            0 |       0.00 |       0.00 |    0.000 |       N/A | E:	estfile.dat (30GB)
     2 |               0 |            0 |       0.00 |       0.00 |    0.000 |       N/A | E:	estfile.dat (30GB)
     3 |               0 |            0 |       0.00 |       0.00 |    0.000 |       N/A | E:	estfile.dat (30GB)
     4 |               0 |            0 |       0.00 |       0.00 |    0.000 |       N/A | E:	estfile.dat (30GB)
     5 |               0 |            0 |       0.00 |       0.00 |    0.000 |       N/A | E:	estfile.dat (30GB)
     6 |               0 |            0 |       0.00 |       0.00 |    0.000 |       N/A | E:	estfile.dat (30GB)
     7 |               0 |            0 |       0.00 |       0.00 |    0.000 |       N/A | E:	estfile.dat (30GB)
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
total:                 0 |            0 |       0.00 |       0.00 |    0.000 |       N/A


  %-ile |  Read (ms) | Write (ms) | Total (ms)
----------------------------------------------
    min |      0.068 |        N/A |      0.068
   25th |      0.261 |        N/A |      0.261
   50th |      0.274 |        N/A |      0.274
   75th |      0.305 |        N/A |      0.305
   90th |      0.413 |        N/A |      0.413
   95th |      3.097 |        N/A |      3.097
   99th |     57.644 |        N/A |     57.644
3-nines |    198.563 |        N/A |    198.563
4-nines |    995.725 |        N/A |    995.725
5-nines |   1896.496 |        N/A |   1896.496
6-nines |   1954.282 |        N/A |   1954.282
7-nines |   1954.318 |        N/A |   1954.318
8-nines |   1954.318 |        N/A |   1954.318
9-nines |   1954.318 |        N/A |   1954.318
    max |   1954.318 |        N/A |   1954.318

The important part of this shows that at 204MB/s throughput and 26k IOPs, I had average 2ms latency.

thread |       bytes     |     I/Os     |     MB/s   |  I/O per s |  AvgLat  | LatStdDev
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
total:       64582090752 |      7883556 |     204.49 |   26175.34 |    2.428 |    22.258

Here is a view from my monitoring software, essentially validating the latency.

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A good starting point for SQL workload testing would be something like:

diskspd –b8K –d30 –o4 –t8 –h –r –w25 –L –Z1G –c20G D:iotest.dat > DiskSpeedResults.txt

At this point, I just need to get the SSD installed on the host and test VMware Flash Read Cache.

To be continued…